Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and by A. Mangham

By A. Mangham

This ebook explores principles of violent femininity throughout widespread and disciplinary limitations in the course of the 19th century. It goals to spotlight how clinical, felony and literary narratives shared notions of the unstable nature of ladies. Mangham lines intersections among infamous criminal trials, theories of girl madness, and sensation novels.

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Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Culture

This publication explores principles of violent femininity throughout commonplace and disciplinary limitations throughout the 19th century. It goals to spotlight how scientific, felony and literary narratives shared notions of the unstable nature of ladies. Mangham lines intersections among infamous criminal trials, theories of woman madness, and sensation novels.

Additional resources for Violent Women and Sensation Fiction: Crime, Medicine and Victorian Popular Culture

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171 Three years later King wrote in the same magazine that if I took up a paper, the extraordinary number of female births was sure to be the first thing to strike my eye. When I got into my ‘bus to get to Explosive Materials 41 my office, I had to work my way to a seat gingerly, as if treading amongst eggs, I was so begirt with bonnets, bandboxes, and babies. […] There were a few black specks of manhood, like the sparsely-sprinkled currants of a meagre school-cake. 172 The imagery that King chooses for his story is revealing.

When Munro arrived at the Bacon’s house it appeared to be empty. She returned the following day, with a friend, and met Martha Bacon in the street. 116 The article’s use of the term ‘burst out’ parallels the favoured ‘burst forth’ of medical writers. Harriet Munro and her friend searched Martha’s home and upon going into the back room on the ground-floor they saw the little boy, sitting on a chair, his head resting on a table, and with his throat cut. […] Subsequently a police constable was fetched, and then the body of the little girl was found lying upstairs on the floor.

By characterising Brough’s violence as grossly different to the ‘norm’, therefore, Winslow’s argument was not supported by the medical climate it ostensibly emerged from. He is too eager, it seems, to represent his evidence in the 32 Violent Women and Sensation Fiction trial of Mary Brough as the only reasonable conclusion available to him. ’139 His vehement attempt to defend his definition of Mary Brough as a maniac (as opposed to a calculating killer) was clearly an attempt to legitimise his previous findings.

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